Jackson County's Phase 2.5 Recovery Plan which provides guidelines for reopening is now in effect. Stay up to date on Phase 2.5 guidelines and local information at cityofLS.net/coronavirus.

Conservation

Water Conservation Tips

Inside The House

  • Don't let the water run needlessly when washing dishes, shaving, or brushing your teeth.
  • Take shorter showers. Keeping showers less than 5 minutes can save up to 1,000 gallons per month.
  • Plug the bathtub before turning the water on, and then adjust the temperature as the tub fills up.
  • Fix leaky faucets. Just one drip a second can waste 2,000 gallons of water per year.
  • If practical, try to run the dishwasher or washing machine only when completely full.
  • If you live in an older home, consider replacing your plumbing with low-flow fixtures and low-flush toilets.
  • Place a bucket in the shower to catch excess water to use to water plants later. This also works when washing dishes or vegetables in the sink.
  • Wash fruits and vegetables in a pan of water instead of running water from the tap
  • When doing laundry, match the water level to the size of the load.

Outside The House

  • Water your lawn only when necessary and consider landscaping with native plants adaptable to your climate's conditions.
  • Place water collection vessels such as barrels or large buckets to collect rain water from down spouts and gutters. Use the water to water your plants.
  • Adjust sprinklers so only your lawn is watered and not the house, sidewalk, or street.
  • Choose shrubs and groundcovers instead of turf for hard-to-water areas such as steep slopes and isolated strips
  • Install covers on pools and spas and check for leaks around your pumps.
  • Use a broom instead of a hose to clean your driveway and sidewalk.
  • If water runs off your lawn easily, split your watering time into shorter periods to allow for better absorption.
  • Check outdoor faucets, sprinklers and hoses for leaks.
  • Check the root zone of your lawn or garden for moisture before watering using a spade or trowel. If it's still moist two inches under the soil surface, you still have enough water.
  • Adjust your lawn mower to a higher setting. A taller lawn shades roots and holds soil moisture better than if it is closely clipped.
  • Install a rain sensor on your irrigation controller so your system won't run when it's raining.
  • Don't water your lawn on windy days when most of the water blows away or evaporates.
  • Water your plants deeply but less frequently to encourage deep root growth and drought tolerance.
  • Set a kitchen timer when watering your lawn or garden to remind you when to stop. A running hose can discharge up to 10 gallons a minute.
  • Use a hose nozzle or turn off the water while you wash your car. You'll save up to 100 gallons every time.
  • Let your lawn go dormant during the summer. Dormant grass only needs to be watered every three weeks or less if it rains.
  • Use sprinklers that deliver big drops of water close to the ground. Smaller water drops and mist often evaporate before they hit the ground.
  • Water only when necessary. More plants die from over-watering than from under-watering
  • Adjust your watering schedule each month to match seasonal weather conditions and landscape requirements.