Residential


Category 1: Lower Intensity (↑ Top)

This residential category is primarily for single-family residential development that ranges from very low-density rural residential with limited farming activities to medium and large lot single-family subdivisions. It also allows single-family cluster development. This use category also accommodates public uses, such as schools, libraries, churches, fire stations, parks and open space. These public uses should be strategically located to promote convenient access for all modes of transportation. Open space, complete sidewalks, internal circulation, grid street network and connections to trails are required.

  • Large lot single-family detached homes with lot sizes in the range of 10,000 square feet;
  • Rural Residential Lots with single-family detached residential parcels in rural areas with lot sizes in the range of two to five acres;
  • Rural ranchette lot with single-family detached residential parcels in rural areas with lot sizes in the range of 5 acres to 10 acres;
  • Single-family detached homes with lot sizes in 8,500 to 10,000 square feet.

Typical suburban character, medium and large-sized lots in subdivisions. No more than three dwelling units/acre.

Bordered by collector or arterial streets with buffers created by Medium Intensity Residential or Commercial.

Residential

Full infrastructure availability and sewer connection required.


Category 2: Medium Intensity (Missing Middle) (↑ Top)

This residential category is primarily for single-family detached residential development on small lots (4,000 - 8,499 square feet). It also allows single-family cluster development. This use category also accommodates public uses, such as schools, libraries, churches, fire stations, parks and open space. These public uses should be strategically located to promote convenient access for all modes of transportation. This category is primarily for accommodating single-family detached and multi-family medium density residential housing Public uses are secondary uses that are allowed. Open space, complete sidewalks, internal circulation, grid street network and connections to trails are required.

  • Small lot single-family detached housing
    (4,000 - 8,499 square foot lots);
  • Duplex side-by-side or stacked;
  • Fourplex stacked;
  • Courtyard building;
  • Cottage Court;
  • Townhome;
  • Muliplex Medium;
  • Triplex-Stacked;
  • Courtyard building
  • Live-Work.

Older type, urban, single-family neighborhoods with smaller lot sizes; may include a mix of residential styles and types. Large lots with a mix of multi-family styles and types. Dwelling units per acre averages 12.

Often serves as a buffer between low-intensity residential and other uses. Scale should be compatible with neighboring uses, typically stepping up from lower density to higher density uses.

Residential Collector

Full infrastructure availability and sewer connection required.


Category 3: Higher Intensity (↑ Top)

This category is primarily for accommodating multifamily residential housing of densities ranging from mid-rise mixed-use to apartments. Public uses are secondary uses that are allowed. Open space, complete sidewalks, internal circulation, grid street network and connections to trails are required.

  • Midrise Mixed Use;
  • Apartment Complexes

Provide pedestrian and bicycle connections to the commercial area with internal circulation and connections to the surrounding neighborhood. Parking is less prominent than pedestrian features. Open space should be designed as a gathering place. Open space should enhance the pedestrian experience. The idea is to put more people near the commercial node to support it so denser residential is located within the five-minute walk radius and less dense located within the 15-minute walk radius. Dwelling units per acre average 36.

The physical layout should aim toward ‘node’ or ‘center’ clusters around an intersection of an arterial or collector street, rather than a ‘corridor’ (strip design), and should be easily accessed by walking, bicycling and by transit.

Residential Collector

Full infrastructure availability and sewer connection required.

Non-Residential


Commercial (↑ Top)

This category includes essentially all kinds of retail uses. Public uses and services should also be allowed in these districts.

  • Daycare;
  • Private Educational Facility;
  • Low-Intensity Strip Commercial;
  • Commercial Recreation Facility;
  • Large Format Standalone Commercial;
  • Medium Intensity Strip Commercial;
  • Regional Mall;
  • Hospital;
  • Golf Course (Private);
  • Hotel;
  • Churches.

Access control, additional landscaping, buffering, and monument signage is required when appropriate.

The scale and character of the development should be compatible with the surrounding area; architectural, urban design, and landscape plans will be required to ensure community character is maintained.

Arterial Collector

Full infrastructure availability and sewer connection required.


Office (↑ Top)

The Office land use category includes a range of office types including the traditional office building used for the conducting of business where little or no sale of products, manufacturing, or warehousing occur. These buildings include both campus-type development as well as single buildings and could include both single and multiple tenants. The category could also include limited research and development activities, manufacturing, or assembly with little or no sale of products. Examples may include medical research spaces, bioscience, technology, or product development testing. Research and Development uses vary widely in terms of what they do, in some cases they are predominantly office with minimal lab or production space, and in others they are more industrial in nature. Settings may range from campus-like business parks to single-use buildings. These uses are like those found in the Light Manufacturing land use category and may include one or the other designation depending on the context of surrounding land uses.

This land-use type is intended to accommodate office development only featuring low-rise buildings.

  • Office complexes featuring one-story buildings and ample parking.

General office activities such as:

  • professional offices
  • financial institutions
  • business services
  • ancillary light retail

Planned office designation should apply when a proposed development adjoins a residential or natural area, larger project areas, or adjacent sensitive uses; planned designation may be utilized in residential areas that are transitioning to a more intense use with limited signage, parking, employees, and the preservation of existing structures and landscaping.

Arterial Collector

Full infrastructure availability and sewer connection required.


Mixed-Use (↑ Top)

This land use designation is intended to accommodate in low-rise buildings a mix of retail, office, service and public uses with a complimentary mix of residential development of varying densities to provide for the greatest amount of flexibility. Business park type of uses may also be mixed with retail and office uses where appropriate. In general, unlike the “Commercial-dominant Mix Use” classification, the mix in this land use category does not impose, in any regulatory terms, an emphasis on any particular type of land use or activity for development. Rather, this emphasis should be determined at the planning and review stage based upon a particular land use plan. The use of “Planned Mixed Use” classification, as its name indicates, should include a master development plan.

Low-rise buildings containing a variable mix of retail, office, hotel and residential uses. Also includes a mixed commercial area that can contain office parks, industrial and warehouse uses and some retail.

Provide pedestrian and bicycle connections to the commercial area with internal circulation and connections to the surrounding neighborhood. Parking is less prominent than pedestrian features. Open space should be designed as a gathering plan. Open space should enhancing the pedestrian experience. The idea is to put more people near the commercial node to support it so denser residential is located within the five minute walk radius and less dense located within the 15 minute walk radius. Low intensity residential should not be located in the 3/4-mile radius (15 minute walk).

The physical layout should aim toward ‘node’ or ‘center’ clusters around an intersection of an arterial or collector street, rather than a ‘corridor’ (strip design), and should be easily accessed by walking, bicycling and by transit.

Residential Collector

Full infrastructure availability and sewer connection required.


Industrial (↑ Top)

This category is for light and heavy industrial uses, distribution and warehouse developments.

Industrial uses including:

  • light manufacturing
  • assembly
  • industrial services

Recommended building types are concrete, masonry, and tilt-up.

Access to arterial, highway, or interstate within 1/8 mile. May have internal driveways. Access does not go through adjacent residential areas and buffers are typically present with residential areas.

Arterial Collector

Full infrastructure availability and sewer connection required.


Civic (↑ Top)

This category is intended to include all public, semi-public and institutional uses, except parks, golf courses and nature preserves that are grouped under a different category.

The Civic/Public land use category includes government buildings, land, and libraries. They are typically public or semipublic in nature. In addition to their primary use, they provide gathering spaces, recreation spaces and opportunities for residents to interact. When located in neighborhoods or commercial centers, the design and layout of facilities should connect with the surrounding areas by providing pedestrian, bicycle, transit as well as vehicular connections where possible. Smaller facilities should be located within, or adjacent to residential areas with multi-modal access (pedestrians, bicycles, transit, and vehicles) is provided.

  • Public Education Facilities (Elementary, Middle and High Schools);
  • College Campus;
  • Government Facilities;
  • Libraries.

Those facilities that serve residential areas (such as branch libraries, post offices and schools) should be grouped together.

Uses are not prohibited in other categories if applicable zoning and design criteria are met. In the absence of a Civic use, Single-Family Residential is an acceptable alternative land use.

Arterial Collector

All Civic facilities should have access to arterials, public transportation and major utility trunk lines.


Airport (↑ Top)

Used exclusively for airport uses and operations. Land area extending from the centerline of airport runways for the protection of taking-off and landing of airplanes per FAA requirements. It is trapezoidal in shape and centered about the extended runway centerline.

Airport Infrastructure and Facilities


Infrastructure (↑ Top)

This land use category includes all types of publicly owned infrastructure.

  • Right of Way;
  • Detention/Utilities;
  • Communications Facility;
  • Transportation Facility;
  • Transit Station;
  • Parking Structure.

Park/Open Space (↑ Top)

This land use category includes all public and private parks, golf courses and nature preserve areas.

The Parks land use category includes both active and passive parks, trails, and open space. For purposes of this plan, the term ‘Open Space’ will be used throughout the document as the name of this land use category. Included are public parks, outdoor recreation facilities, state-operated nature preserves, County park land such as, natural resource protection areas and other privately owned open space throughout the City. Schools, churches, and civic institutions may incorporate open space into their developments; however, this land-use plan will defer to the primary land use when depicted on the land use map.

  • Parks;
  • Open Space;
  • Golf Course (Public);
  • Cemetery (Public).

As currently exists or recommended by the Parks Master Plan.

Various types of parks have different location and compatibility characteristics. A neighborhood park is typically small, located in residential areas, and with walkable access for nearby residents. Larger community parks are located along collector street allowing higher traffic and accessibility for the entire community. Community parks often have sports amenities, shelter and picnic facilities.

Residential Corridor

No/minimal infrastructure.


Water Bodies (↑ Top)

This land use category includes all water bodies: lakes, rivers, streams with public and private access.

  • Lakes;
  • Streams;
  • Rivers.

As currently exists or recommended.

No/minimal infrastructure