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Facts | Illegal Storm Drain Dumping | Storm Drain Stenciling Program | Stream Team | Adopt-A-Street/Stream | Floodplain Information

 

 Floodplain Information

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), publishes Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) that identify Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHAs).  On January 20, 2017, FEMA published new FIRMs for the City of Lee’s Summit.  Some properties that were not formerly located within SFHAs are now included.

The intent of the NFIP, as described by FEMA, is to “reduce future flood damage…and provide protection for property owners against potential losses.”   The City of Lee’s Summit participates in the NFIP to allow flood insurance protection for property owners.  A property must be located within a local city or county that participates in the NFIP to be eligible for flood insurance policies on their properties.

In recent years, Congress has passed several significant changes to the NFIP. These changes discontinue federally-subsidized insurance rates and amended all flood insurance policies to actuarial rates by means of annual increases.  Annual rate increases are expected to range from 5-15% until actuarial rates are achieved.  Flood insurance is federally required for mortgage holders with properties or structures located within a SFHA. 




FLOODPLAIN FAQs

Why did I get a letter from my insurance company/mortgage lender/FEMA?

If you received a letter from your insurance company, mortgage lender, or FEMA regarding the FEMA-designated floodplain, it is likely because A) a portion of your property is located within a designated floodplain, B) flood insurance is now required on your property, or C) insurance premiums have changed for existing flood insurance policies.

Why are my flood insurance premiums increasing?

If you received a letter from your insurance company, mortgage lender, or FEMA indicating that your flood insurance premiums are increasing, it is because your property is located within a FEMA-designated floodplain.  Recent changes to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) discontinue federally-subsidized insurance rates.  All flood insurance policies will gradually increase over several years to full actuarial rates by means of annual increases.  These annual increases are expected to range from 5-15% until actuarial rates are achieved.  Federal regulations mandated flood insurance to be purchased by mortgage holders with properties or structures located within a floodplain.

Why have the FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) been updated?

The FIRMs are updated by FEMA on a regular basis to reflect more accurate topographic information than was previously available.  FEMA uses very specific state of the art practices to determine floodplains and develop FIRMS, which are available electronically at the FEMA Flood Map Service Center (https://msc.fema.gov/portal).

How did FEMA determine that my property is located within a floodplain?

FEMA uses very specific state of the art practices to determine floodplains and develop Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs), which are available electronically at the FEMA Flood Map Service Center (https://msc.fema.gov/portal).

How do I determine if my property is located in the FEMA-designated floodplain?

Visit FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center (https://msc.fema.gov/portal) to locate the flood map for your area and determine your property’s proximity to the FEMA-designated floodplain.

Can I get my property removed from the FEMA-designated floodplain?

Although FEMA uses very specific and thorough practices to develop Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs), in some circumstances, small areas above the base flood elevation (BFE) may be inadvertently included in a FEMA-designated floodplain.  If an inadvertently-included home or property is above the BFE, the property owner may qualify for a Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA) to remove the structure from the FEMA-designated floodplain.  Property owners can visit FEMA’s LOMA website (https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/19871) to determine how to prepare a LOMA.  If a property does not qualify for a LOMA, an elevation certificate could help evaluate exact property elevations for more accurate flood insurance premiums.  A licensed land surveyor is required to prepare both LOMAs and elevation certificates.

What can the City do to help me?

The City can direct residents and businesses to FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center (https://msc.fema.gov/portal) to determine if specific properties are located within a FEMA-designated floodplain.  The City can also direct residents and businesses to FEMA’s LOMA website (https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/19871) to determine how to apply for a LOMA.

Can the City survey my property for me and prepare a LOMA or Elevation Certificate?

No.  A licensed land surveyor is required to develop a legal survey and prepare a LOMA or an elevation certificate.


Additional Resources

Information on identifying FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) can be found at https://msc.fema.gov/portal.  The City has prepared steps to aid in finding a property on FEMA FIRMs.

Information on the Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA) application process can be found at https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/19871

Additional FEMA Brochures, Booklets, Information Sheets and resources can be found at https://www.fema.gov/national-flood-insurance-program-publications